Container technology will re-imagine the application landscape: Ravi Pinto, Oracle

By Saheli Sen Gupta Oct 12th 2017
Container technology will re-imagine the application landscape: Ravi Pinto, Oracle

Ravi Pinto, Director–Product Management of Oracle talks about how the company's partnerships with both Docker and Kubernetes is keeping it stay ahead of the competition.

Companies are slowly envisioning themselves as technology companies, says Ravi Pinto, director – product management, Oracle Cloud Platform and Cloud Machine. Companies are slowly looking to adopt newer technologies and deliver their own products and services, thereby differentiating themselves from others, he adds. In a conversation with Computerworld India, Pinto talks about secure DevOps, how container technologies are rapidly gaining momentum, multi-cloud environments and Oracle's role in it.

Edited Excerpts.

How is Oracle leveraging container technologies like Dockers and Kubernetes? How do you see the market react to container technology?

Oracle's adoption of Kubernetes and Docker technologies surpasses newer players by a significant margin. Using these, not only have we simplified the delivery of our solutions, but have also succeeded in making our developing processes faster. Oracle has partnered with Docker and at Docker Con, we announced that all our software will be available as docker-deliverables. We have also joined Kubernetes and have developers contributing to the development of the Kubernetes project. Additionally, we have converted three of our container-related projects into open source projects. Our focus has been on how we can use container technology to not only help developers in building applications but also for customers to successfully deploy these applications.

Secure DevOps is a big deal in the market right now, and the market has been treating it as an afterthought for a long time.”

At Oracle, we provide three levels of container-related services, dividing the market into fully aware, somewhat aware and completely unaware of the technology. Since the first category can do everything themselves, we only provide IaaS and for the second ones, we make deployment of Docker images easier. However, for the third category, we only ask for their source code so that we can spin up the containers and undertake the deployment for them.

Container technology will create a huge momentum in the market. Docker is already available on Linux, Mac and Windows, making the platform universal to developers working on any of the systems. Container technology will re-imagine the entire application landscape.

What is your take on secure DevOps?

For a lot of companies, security is an afterthought but Oracle has always been focused on security. We look at security at each level, as a cross-cutting concern and we've seen how it can be applied to DevOps as well. Enterprise customers are highly finicky about their IP and are very protective of their source code.

Secure DevOps is a big deal in the market right now, and the market has been treating it as an afterthought for a long time. Developers usually work solely towards delivering an application and may often overlook a lot of aspects including security, in order to meet their deadline.

However, with the recent attacks in mind, the industry is taking a step back and realizing the dire need for best practices around security in DevOps.

How does Oracle plan to stay relevant in the multi-cloud environment of today?

While we do not have a fixed strategy right now, we are closely studying it. In our existing portfolio, we already have a few options for our customers including a Cloud Machine. Going forward, we will also be offering a private cloud service. The one way I see a multi-cloud environment succeeding is adhering to open standards. As long as uniform and open standards are adhered by all the vendors, it shouldn't be an issue at all.

Oracle's offering goes one step ahead and we also offer a unique 'Data-as-a-service', which essentially personalizes experiences for consumers based on data provided by a customer. Additionally, our PaaS on cloud machine is the same as it would be on the public cloud.”

Once the momentum rises, vendors will automatically align themselves to stay relevant in the market. For Indian customers, adopting cloud is still not a very straightforward decision despite the resolution of security and administrative concerns of the domain.

There are four different kinds of customers; the early adopters who will try out anything, the ones who are a little behind them. Then comes the majority who will only dip its toes into something once they know it's working for others, and finally the dinosaurs - who are extremely reluctant to change.

What sets Oracle apart from its competition?

Right from the infrastructure to the platform and to SaaS, Oracle is the only vendor who provides the entire landscape. We have had this advantage in on-premise, and we have it on the cloud as well. Oracle's offering goes one step ahead and we also offer a unique 'Data-as-a-Service', which essentially personalizes experiences for consumers based on data provided by a customer. Additionally, our PaaS on Cloud Machine is the same as it would be on the public cloud.

Customers also look at companies they can depend upon and can stay with them over a longer period of time, something that also works in our favor.

What are the three technological trends you see in the market?

One of the major trends right now is the focus on cloud-native application development. Customers and developers alike are also extremely open to adopting newer interfaces and paradigms like chatbots as nobody wants to run a multitude of mobile applications. There is a lot of focus on the adoption of JavaScript and node.js based development, with large-scale innovation taking place in that area.

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